Pregnancy Discrimination. Sexual Harassment. Gender Pay Disparity. Employee Rights. Old-Time Lefty. Feminist. Father. Powerlifter. @JackTuckner #YesAllWomen #AllMenCan

http://womensrightsny.com

Ask any women's workplace rights questions.

teampinup:

What happens when, in a country more in the news for rapes, women wield the stick and take on real-life villains? It forges a force of female empowerment on such a level as this.

In a region that is one of the poorest districts in the country and is marked by a deeply patriarchal culture, rigid caste divisions, female illiteracy, domestic violence, child labour, child marraiges and dowry demands. The women’s group is popularly known as Gulabi or ‘Pink’ Gang because the members wear bright pink saris and wield bamboo sticks. Sampat says, “We are not a gang in the usual sense of the term, we are a gang for justice.” The Gulabi Gang was initially intended to punish oppressive husbands, fathers and brothers, and combat domestic violence and desertion. The members of the gang would accost male offenders and prevail upon them to see reason. The more serious offenders were publicly shamed when they refused to listen or relent. Sometimes the women resorted to their lathis, if the men resorted to use of force.

We as women are not free of oppression, derogation and violence until all women everywhere are. Being a feminist is not something to be ashamed of. ♡ Micheline #yesallwomen #pinkgang #gulabigang #feminist #feminism

(via percyjacksonluvr)

poetic-injustices:

chakorie:

two-browngirls:

AMBREEN SADIQ - ONE OF BRITAIN’S FIRST FEMALE MUSLIM BOXERS

I loved this recent article on boxer, Ambreen Sadiq. Not only has she fought and won numerous fights in the ring but she’s fought through the prejudice that some of her family members have about her profession. 

After appearing in the local newspapers and a Channel 4 documentary about her journey, Ambreen faced criticism and even death threats from men and women in the Muslim community. But she says that it isn’t the religion that causes the problem… 

“A lot of Muslim people say it’s about religion,” she says. “But I think it’s more about the culture and how people have been brought up. Men and women are treated equally [in the religion]. In the culture, it’s like the women should be at home cooking tea. The men put the food on the table.”

Now Ambreen’s story has been transformed into a play that is featuring at Edinburgh Festival - ‘No Guts, No Heart, No Glory’ check out the trailer here:

“It’s great that I can get my story out there,” says Sadiq. She wants to spread the message that Muslim girls can do whatever they want – whether dance, ballet, boxing, or football. “I think girls should be doing anything they want to be doing,” she insists.

- S

F*CK IT UP!!

 another brown girl slaying

readreadreadingismylife:

theskaldspeaks:

anotherveganpunk:

This kid here is Julian, he’s 2 years old now. He was tragically injured in a car accident at 6 months old, thanks to a drunk driver asshole. He’s been in a wheelchair ever since. The doctors he goes to now say they don’t have enough experience dealing with those injuries on such a young person. Shriner’s in Chicago offered a free evaluation, they just need to get and stay there which unfortunately costs a lot of money anyway. So there’s this fund going and even if you can’t donate yourself please just signal boost this and maybe it reaches people who can.  
(I’m trying not to be mad as fuck but seeing funds for shit like racist cops and potato salad reaching thousands and this fund going so slow is making it really hard not to get absolutely livid and throw stuff around.)

Guys, signal boost the fuck out of this. This kid has a shot at free treatment, and they just need to money to get to the Shriners hospital. 


Signal boost
readreadreadingismylife:

theskaldspeaks:

anotherveganpunk:

This kid here is Julian, he’s 2 years old now. He was tragically injured in a car accident at 6 months old, thanks to a drunk driver asshole. He’s been in a wheelchair ever since. The doctors he goes to now say they don’t have enough experience dealing with those injuries on such a young person. Shriner’s in Chicago offered a free evaluation, they just need to get and stay there which unfortunately costs a lot of money anyway. So there’s this fund going and even if you can’t donate yourself please just signal boost this and maybe it reaches people who can.  
(I’m trying not to be mad as fuck but seeing funds for shit like racist cops and potato salad reaching thousands and this fund going so slow is making it really hard not to get absolutely livid and throw stuff around.)

Guys, signal boost the fuck out of this. This kid has a shot at free treatment, and they just need to money to get to the Shriners hospital. 


Signal boost

readreadreadingismylife:

theskaldspeaks:

anotherveganpunk:

This kid here is Julian, he’s 2 years old now. He was tragically injured in a car accident at 6 months old, thanks to a drunk driver asshole. He’s been in a wheelchair ever since. The doctors he goes to now say they don’t have enough experience dealing with those injuries on such a young person. Shriner’s in Chicago offered a free evaluation, they just need to get and stay there which unfortunately costs a lot of money anyway. So there’s this fund going and even if you can’t donate yourself please just signal boost this and maybe it reaches people who can.  

(I’m trying not to be mad as fuck but seeing funds for shit like racist cops and potato salad reaching thousands and this fund going so slow is making it really hard not to get absolutely livid and throw stuff around.)

Guys, signal boost the fuck out of this. This kid has a shot at free treatment, and they just need to money to get to the Shriners hospital. 

Signal boost

A woman working full-time is still making 77 cents on average against each $1 a man earns working full-time doing comparable work. A bill to remedy that is called the Paycheck Fairness Act, but Republicans have repeatedly blocked it, despite strong support from the White House and Democrats. The Paycheck Fairness Act would strengthen the Equal Pay Act, because it contains practical steps for promoting fair pay for women. It would enhance the Court remedies available for victims of gender-based discrimination, and it would put the burden on employers to demonstrate why a woman is being paid less than a man for performing comparable work, punishing employers if they retaliate against employees for sharing salary information, and allowing enhanced monetary compensation if discrimination or retaliation is proved in Court.

Last April, every single Republican voted against the Paycheck Fairness Act (the same corporate-owned hucksters who recently voted against raising the minimum wage, or allowing students to refinance their student loans). The midterm elections are around the corner, so Senate Democrats are giving Republicans another shot to ensure women earn equal pay for equal work. This critical vote is expected to occur this Monday, September 15, but don’t hold your breath waiting for a little common sense justice. There’s too much money and power pushing back; though of course, closing the wage gap and raising the minimum wage helps everyone, not just the grossly underpaid, but also their children and families, and the entire economy as a result.

I want my daughters, sisters, mother and wife to earn a salary and benefits equal to what some yo-yo guy earns for performing the same job. I want them to earn what they’re worth. Don’t you want that for the women in your life? Ask a Republican you love (or one who represents you) why they’re dead set against equal pay for women—maybe they can explain it so you’ll understand it. Please let me know. I’ll wait.

azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.
azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.




So true. Beautiful.

azephirin:

I am a woman. I am a practicing attorney. I am the only woman in my office over the age of 35 who doesn’t color her hair. I have some gray, but not a lot yet, and I never seriously considered coloring my hair until this job. I don’t want to: it’s expensive and a pain in the ass to keep up. About a year ago, I was in court, and a female attorney walked in with curly, bobbed, naturally gray hair, and her mere act of publicly displaying her natural hair color seemed not just unusual but defiant. Meanwhile many men in my office and in the courts have gray hair, and I doubt anyone thinks twice about it.

So true. Beautiful.

(via judeofalltrades)